02 Oct

New York’s adaptation of Common Core

Adopted July 19, 2010, New York brought in the Common Core standards in a very similar fashion to the rest of the US. Though initially planned to be put into practice by the 2013-14 school year, it has since faced an extension as educators and parents continue to vehemently express their concerns. However, such a move is leaving the state without a way to hold their teachers accountable for poor performance.

More Time

Though everything was supposed to be ready to go by the end of 2013, New York’s Board of Regents, the group responsible for overseeing all educational activity of the state, managed to delay the implementation by five more years, promising even the class of 2022 that they won’t be held to the standards. On top of this, they also granted teachers a two years’ reprieve from any type of consequences stemming from the new standardized test being given.

According to the group, they have heard concerns from both teachers and parents and feel everyone still requires more time to adjust accordingly. Many see this as an understandable reaction since just last year the new statewide exam was given, resulting in plummeting test scores. Many immediately blamed those in charge of the state’s educational system, citing that they failed to prepare classrooms enough for the change.

More Money

Of course, this change doesn’t come cheaply. In fact, this new course comes with a price tag of $525 million that will be used to train teachers to implement the standards. The Governor was less than pleased to hear this, especially since the teachers wouldn’t be held accountable for two years. In retaliation, he called for a serious re-examination of the ability of the Board of Regents to perform correctly, citing the two year grace period as yet another way for them to block the implementation of any kind of teacher evaluation system. One, he says, that is desperately needed.

However, not everyone is upset. The many legislators on both sides of the fence that were pushing for a delay understandably fully support this decision. It’s a step in the right direction to these supporters, giving parents, students and teachers what they’ve needed to ease most of the concerns.
In New York, the question isn’t about whether to get rid of Common Core, it’s about whether or not it will ever be implemented. Already the official switchover date has been pushed back nearly a decade in addition to postponing the general exam’s ability to prove or disprove a teacher’s abilities. No matter the outcome, the schools now have plenty of time to figure out and implement the Common Core standards that are so much tougher than New York’s previous requirements.